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A Day in the Life of the Nissequogue River 2014

SunkenMeadow_Vicky

Victoria O’Neill, LISS Habitat Restoration Coordinator for NY, identifies salt marsh species with local high school students at Sunken Meadow State Park. Photo credit: Amy Mandelbaum.

On Wednesday, October 15, 2014, the “A Day in the Life of the Nissequogue River 2014” event will occur along the Nissequogue River, a Long Island Sound Stewardship Area.

As part of the “A Day in the Life of the Nissequogue River 2014” event, students and teachers from 10 schools in Long Island will be engaging in hands-on science exploration of the Nissequogue River system. The data that the schools will collect will be made available to the public from on the “Day in the Life” website.

The “Day in the Life” program’s goals are to help students develop an appreciation for and knowledge of Long Island’s River and estuary ecosystems, to collect useful scientific data in regard to the status of associated surface waters, and to allow students to become stewards of water quality and natural resources. Two other “Day in the Life” events have occurred along the Carman’s River and the Peconic Estuary, on September 24 and October 1, respectively.

The Nissequogue River is home to one of the largest coastal wetlands on the North Shore of Long Island. The river runs for nine miles from the freshwater Hauppauge Springs to Smithtown Bay in Long Island Sound. Comprised of open meadows, wooded hillsides, tidal mudflats, bluffs, and both salt and freshwater marshes, this area supports habitat which sustain a wide variety of flora and fauna. The Nissequogue River, the largest tributary to the Sound in New York, has been designated as a “Scenic and Recreational River” by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. It is also designated as “Significant Coastal Fish and Wildlife Habitat” by US Fish and Wildlife Service. The Nissequogue River watershed is an environmental asset to Long Island, and also provides great recreational opportunities for both the sea-fairing and land-dwelling alike.

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