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2005 Project Summaries

New York

City Parks Foundation

Project: Long Island City/Astoria Waterfront Catalyst Project
Long Island Sound Futures Fund Grant: $35,000
Matching Funds: $170,000

The City Parks Foundation will conduct educational workshops and 80 public outreach programs as well as engage in restoration and recreation activities at seven waterfront parks to raise awareness about the Long Island City waterfront. Local knowledge and skills will be increased about natural resources, native flora, restoration, and preservation. Habitat restoration activities will occur for tidal wetlands existing along a largely developed coastline. Through the proposed restoration projects, the project will enhance these natural areas to create habitat that attracts great egrets, great blue herons, snowy egrets, black crowned night herons, cormorants, and glossy ibis. Project partners will include New York Department of Parks and Recreation’s Natural Resources Group, Long Island City Community Boathouse, Socrates Sculpture Park, Astoria Residents Reclaiming Our World, Goodwill Industries of New York and New Jersey, Long Island City High School, and The Greater Astoria Historical Society.

Funding is provided by the US Environmental Protection Agency and New York Environmental Trust.

Coalition to Save Hempstead Harbor

Project: Citizens Water-Monitoring Program
Long Island Sound Futures Fund Grant: $30,000
Matching Funds: $65,400

The Coalition to Save Hempstead Harbor will enhance and expand its Citizen Water Monitoring Program for Hempstead Harbor. A Quality Assurance Project Plan will be prepared to improve the quality of data collected by the Coalition increasing its potential use by public and private partners.. The data will be used in a comprehensive water monitoring report for the 2005 season. Three volunteer training sessions will be held and monitoring will take place on a weekly basis through November 2005.. Project partners include the Town of Oyster Bay, Nassau County, Hempstead Harbor Committee, the Marine Sciences Department of the University of Connecticut and the Nassau County Marine Police.

Funding provided by the US Environmental Protection Agency.

Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County

Project: Sound Experiences- From Ship to Shore
Long Island Sound Futures Fund Grant: $30,000
Matching Funds: $18,930

The Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County, in partnership with the Waterfront Center, will promote a greater understanding of the Long Island Sound by educating 30 groups of students from schools in low-income communities in Suffolk and Nassau County. Up to 750 children will be reached through fully funded Long Island Sound field and learning experiences. Topics to be covered through these learning experiences include: water quality issues, the interrelationship between the health of the Sound and the condition of the local watershed, and stewardship of the Sound.

Funding is provided by the US Environmental Protection Agency.

Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County

Project: Long Island Sound Eelgrass Restoration Project
Long Island Sound Futures Fund Grant: $60,000
Matching Funds: $24,400

The Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County will create a 2-acre eelgrass meadow located at St. Thomas Point, 3.5 miles west of Mulford Point, the only other eelgrass meadow on the north shore of Long Island. Test plantings of 1,000 shoots each will be conducted at two additional sites, one east and one west of St. Thomas point. The project will develop restoration methods uniquely suited to the open water-high energy nature of Long Island Sound. Project partners will include the Board of Trustees for the Town of Southold and a group of experienced volunteer divers.

Funding is provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Edith G. Read Natural Park and Wildlife Sanctuary

Project: Mitigation of Playland Parking Lot Stormwater Effluent
Long Island Sound Futures Fund Grant: $36,400
Matching Funds: $17,900

The Edith G. Read Natural Park and Wildlife Sanctuary will improve water quality in an 80.2-acre tidal wetland located next to an amusement park by limiting the amount of contaminants that enter the lake from run-off from the Playland parking lot. Storm drain inserts will be installed which remove a variety of contaminants including heavy metals and oils. The inserts will be maintained for one year and water samples will be tested before an after installation. Additionally, signage will be put up to educate the public on the greening efforts being done at Playland Amusement Park. Project partners will include Westchester County Department of Parks, Recreation and Conservation and the Friends of Read Wildlife Sanctuary, Inc.

Funding provided by the US Environmental Protection Agency.

Friends of Flax Pond

Project: Habitat Monitoring in Flax Pond
Long Island Sound Futures Fund Grant: $25,000
Matching Funds: $34,095

The Friends of Flax Pond will conduct 5 habitat monitoring studies in Flax Pond, a series of 4 scientific lectures to the local public to disseminate the results of these studies and stimulate community interest and involvement in the preservation of Flax Pond. The lecture series will reach 150 local residents and 15 to 20 high school students and community residents will be recruited to participate in the habitat monitoring studies. All habitat and species monitoring data recorded will be used to foster the development of a community supported stewardship plan for Flax Pond in the future. Project partners will include Stony Brook Environmental Conservancy, Stony Brook University, and New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.

Funding provided by the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

Regional Plan Association

Project: Long Island Sound Stewardship Initiative Nissequogue River Watershed Project
Great Pond Wetland Preservation and Restoration
Long Island Sound Futures Fund Grant: $40,000
Matching Funds: $75,000

As the first year of a two-year project, the Regional Plan Association (RPA) will convene and work with a Stakeholder Committee to compile natural resources data, and identify issues and opportunities in the Nissequogue River watershed. This project will ultimately result in a comprehensive analysis of opportunities and challenges to protecting and stewarding the natural and recreational resources of one of Long Islands most important watersheds. Project partners include the New York State Department of Environmental Control and the New York State Parks and Recreation.

Funding is provided by the US Environmental Protection Agency.

Riverhead Foundation for Marine Research and Preservation

Project: Educating the Public to Make a Difference
Long Island Sound Futures Fund Grant: $20,000
Matching Funds: $19,520

The Riverhead Foundation for Marine Research and Preservation will develop a voluntary citizen based marine mammal and sea turtle monitoring program to coordinate survey efforts with ongoing aerial, shop, and land based projects. Weekly lectures open to people of all ages and backgrounds will be conducted to educate communities around the Long Island Sound about the marine ecology of the area. Hands-on activities, interactive tours of the hospital facility, and animal identification exercises will reinforce the information given at the lectures. The Riverhead Foundation continues to work with researchers from the Maritime Aquarium at Norwalk and Project Oceanology who all participate in the Valentine’s Day seal count, surveying seal haul out sites in the Long Island Sound including areas in Fisher’s Bay, New Haven, and Sheffield Island.. Combining efforts of volunteer based surveys and professional stranding and research organizations will enhance the quality of research conducted and data obtained from surveys of the Long Island Sound.

Funding is provided by the US Environmental Protection Agency.

Town of North Hempstead

Project: Hempstead Harbor Cove Wetland Restoration
Long Island Sound Futures Fund Grant: $75,000
Matching Funds: $125,000

The Town of North Hempstead will restore approximately 4 acres of tidal wetland within Hempstead Harbor Cove by stabilizing shoreline, removing debris, fill, and invasive plants, and planting native wetland species. The project is located near a former industrial area and enhances the biological value and visual appeal of the site near a shoreline nature trail. This project expands on a successful community-based wetland restoration completed in 2003. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, US Fish and Wildlife Service, and New York Department of Environmental Conservation are providing technical assistance to the Town of Hempstead. Numerous community organizations and volunteers will assist with the implementation.

Funding is provided by US Fish and Wildlife Service.

Village of Larchmont

Project: Flint Park Waterfront Environmental Area
Long Island Sound Futures Fund Grant: $25,000
Matching Funds: $438,800

The Village of Larchmont will open the publicly-owned waterfront of Flint Park, portions of which closest to the Long Island Sound are presently inaccessible to the public, to create a recreational and educational area. Approximately 700 linear feet of waterfront will be open. Additionally, a new pervious walking trail linked to the Town of Mamaroneck’s Hommock’s Conservation area, interpretive signage, and a bird watching platform will be installed at the Park. Project partners will include the Village Board, representatives of the Village Beautification, Environmental, Parks and Trees, Recreation, and Traffic Committees, the League of Women Voters, three active youth sports leagues, the local environmental center, Flint Park Conservancy, and New York State Office of Parks.

Funding is provided by the US Environmental Protection Agency.

Ward Melville Heritage Organization

Project: Sound Practices for West Meadow
Long Island Sound Futures Fund Grant: $15,000
Matching Funds: $11,245

The Ward Melville Heritage Organization will provide public access to and education about Stony Brook Harbor and the surrounding wetlands along West Meadow Beach and West Meadow Creek. Through boat cruises, restoration activities, onsite classes and distance learning technology, people of all ages and across Long Island will learn about the importance and fragility of the wetlands ecosystem. Up to 4,800 adults and children will be reached annually through this project including the Ward Melville Youth Corps, a group of 30 youth volunteers who plant native vegetation in eroding areas of this special salt marsh ecosystem. Project partners will include the Marine Sciences Research Center at Stony Brook University., and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.

Funding provided by the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

Connecticut

Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, Bureau of Natural Resources, Wildlife Division

Project: Barn Island Wildlife Management Area Marsh Overlook
Long Island Sound Futures Fund Grant: $28,200
Matching Funds: $14,400

The Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, Bureau of Natural Resources, Wildlife Division will design, install, and maintain a one-half acre exhibit of native plants common to the Connecticut coastal area at the Barn Island Wildlife Management Area. Barn Island is one of the state’s premier wildlife management areas because it hosts a mosaic of habitat that supports imperiled species. ADA compliant pathways leading to the exhibit will increase access to the facility. Educational signage will be installed to describing the importance of using native plants and individual markers will identify featured species. Project partners will include Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection- Long Island Sound Fund, Connecticut College Arboretum and Denison-Pequotsepos Nature Center.

Funding provided by the US Environmental Protection Agency.

Branford Land Trust

Project: Branford Fishway
Long Island Sound Futures Fund Grant: $60,000
Matching Funds: $120,100

The Branford Land Trust, Inc. will restore anadromous fish passage by constructing a fishway over a dam at the Supply Ponds on the Queach Brook. The project represents an innovative partnership between a town, a land trust and a Rotary Club to build a fishway to support migration of alewife, blueback herring and brown trout, and to provide a research opportunity for a nearby university to observe the ecology of these sea-fish in inland waters. The fishway will open 75-86 acres of lake habitat, 9 acres of riparian swamps, and 4-5 miles of free-flowing streams to anadromous fish runs. Additionally, the fishway will accommodate an electronic fish counter. Project partners include the Branford Rotary Club, the Town of Branford, Yale University, Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection- Inland Fisheries Division and Long Island Sound Fund, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Restoration Center, the US Fish and Wildlife Service, and the USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service.

Funding is provided by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Eastern Connecticut Resource Conservation & Development

Project: Land Use Leadership Alliance for Connecticut Land Use Decision Makers
Long Island Sound Futures Fund Grant: $40,000
Matching Funds: $71,000

The Eastern Connecticut Resource Conservation & Development will implement 4-day community-based land use leadership training workshops in the Connecticut River Valley, reaching up to 70 public officials from 13 towns, in the spring of 2006. The program will provide information, training, and technical assistance about land use law and natural resources protection to strengthen community planning. It will promote an informed and educated constituency involved in community decisions affecting the ecological health of the Long Island Sound and its living marine resources and build partnerships at multiple levels. Project partners will include Tidewater Institute, MetroHartford Alliance, Capitol Region Council of Governments, Pace University Land Use Law Center, and the USDA- Natural Resources Conservation Service.

Funding is provided by the US Environmental Protection Agency and the USDA- Natural Resources Conservation Service.

City of Norwalk

Project: Stormwater Control Demonstration Project
Long Island Sound Futures Fund Grant: $35,000
Matching Funds: $50,000

The City of Norwalk, CT will implement 6 storm water Best Management Practices (BMPs), as identified in an earlier study, in order to reduce the amount of sediment and pollutants reaching Norwalk Harbor. After the BMPs are installed and implemented throughout the two watersheds, the water quality will be monitored for several rainfall events and the results will then be used to develop a City-wide plan for storm water management. The City will provide the results of the pilot study to any interested town or community, local and state environmental organizations, and interested citizens, etc. through presentations, and on the City’s website. Project partners include the Norwalk River Watershed Initiative, the Long Island Soundkeeper, the Maritime Aquarium of Norwalk, Total Norwalk Seaport Association, and several active neighborhood associations.

Funding is provided by the US Environmental Protection Agency.

Friends of the Hockanum River Linear Park of Vernon, Inc.

Project: State of the Watershed Assessment for the Tankerhoosen River Watershed
Long Island Sound Futures Fund Grant: $25,000
Matching Funds: $14,000

The Friends of the Hockanum River Linear Park of Vernon, Inc. will collect and evaluate chemical and biological water quality monitoring data at up to 8 key locations within the Tankerhoosen River Watershed. Current baseline water quality conditions will be established, water quality impacts from potential point and non-point pollution sources will be identified, and a water quality database for the watershed to guide environmental decision-making and measure the progress toward meeting water quality goals in the watershed will begin to be developed. A Quality Assurance Project Plan will be developed to ensure that sampling, sample analysis and the resulting data will be of sufficient quality for use by public and private agencies. Project partners will include Vernon Conservation Commission and the Hockanum River Watershed Association.

Funding provided by the US Environmental Protection Agency.

Interdistrict Committee for Project Oceanology

Project: Science Education in Action Linking Students and the Sound (SEALSS)
Long Island Sound Futures Fund Grant: $35,000
Matching Funds: $65,700

The Interdistrict Committee for Project Oceanology will immerse middle and high school students in a 2 day harbor seal research monitoring educational program. Students will observe behavior and collect data on a wild population of harbor seals in Eastern Long Island Sound. The project will involve 840 students and their teachers from schools in Connecticut and New York. The data collected will be entered into a database for access and use by regional harbor seal researchers. Project partners include the University of Connecticut and the Maritime Aquarium at Norwalk.

Funding is provided by the US Environmental Protection Agency and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Lyme Land Conservation Trust, Inc.

Project: Moulson Pond Fishway Repairs
Long Island Sound Futures Fund Grant: $45,500
Matching Funds: $12,500

The Lyme Land Conservation Trust, Inc will construct a fishway restoring upstream access to a river blocked since colonial times. The project will establish a vital spawning area for blueback herring and trout, as well as improving conditions for commercial and recreational game fishing. The completed project will maintain the restoration of migratory fish to the entire Eightmile River Watershed, which is currently under study for designation under the Federal Wild and Scenic Program. Project partners will include Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, Connecticut River Watershed Council local landowners, and a committed cadre of volunteer monitors.

Funding provided by the Funding provided by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Old Saybrook Land Trust

Project: Ingham Hill Pond Improvements and Fishway
Long Island Sound Futures Fund Grant: $75,000
Matching Funds: $56,354

The Old Saybrook Land Trust will repair the Ingham Hill Pond Dam and install a fishway pass unit. The project will provide a path for migrating Atlantic salmon, alewife, blueback herring and brown trout in a watershed which is currently being considered for designation as a Federal Wild and Scenic River. Additionally, Lake Rockview will be open to recreational fishing and an outdoor education program will be established through the Old Saybrook Parks and Recreation Department. Project partners will include the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection- Long Island Sound Fund, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service

Funding is provided by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Sacred Heart University

Project: Project Limulus: Ecology & Conservation of the American Horseshoe Crab
Long Island Sound Futures Fund Grant: $30,000
Matching Funds: $13,050

The Sacred Heart University will conduct research on and educate the public about the economic and ecological importance of horseshoe crabs in the Long Island Sound. The public will be educated through direct involvement, educational displays, scientific papers, presentations, and a website. Training sessions will be provided for community members to participate in the research, with at least 50 teachers from several school districts and their K-12 students participating to learn to measure, tag, and record data for the project. Project partners include the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection-Long Island Sound Fund, the Maritime Aquarium, and the Connecticut Audubon Coastal Center.

Funding is provided by the US Environmental Protection Agency and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Saugatuck Watershed Partnership

Project: The Connecticut Nature Conservancy
Long Island Sound Futures Fund Grant: $25,000
Matching Funds: $11,000

The Connecticut Nature Conservancy will create a watershed partnership and Watershed Action Plan to foster protection and enhancement of biodiversity within the Saugatuck River Watershed. Three workshops will be organized for representatives from each of the eleven towns within the watershed including environmental experts, natural resources agencies and stakeholder groups to develop the Watershed Action Plan. Prior to the completion of the action plan, a watershed coordinator will be hired by the watershed partnership with responsibilities for the plan. Potential project partners will include Southwest Conservation District, the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, Trout Unlimited, National Audubon, RiverWatch, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service and the watershed towns.

Funding provided by the US Environmental Protection Agency.

Solar Youth, Inc.

Project: Citywide Steward Program
Long Island Sound Futures Fund Grant: $20,000
Matching Funds: $15,500

Solar Youth will conduct the fifth year of the Citywide Steward Program — a 5-week environmental education and youth development summer program that provides positive, educational opportunities to children who live in the low-income communities of New Haven. Up to 30 youth ages 9-14 will participate in the program using “Watersheds,” this year’s program theme, as the foundation of all exploration, community service, and public education. At least three high school students will be trained and hired as interns and at least 200 additional people will be indirectly reached through the youth-led community service action and public education projects related to the local and Long Island watersheds. Project partners will include the New Haven Department of Parks and Recreation, Schooner, Inc., Peabody Museum, and Southern Connecticut State University.

Funding is provided by the US Environmental Protection Agency.

Sound School Regional Vocational Aquaculture Center

Project: New Haven Harbor Watershed Environmental Monitoring Program
Long Island Sound Futures Fund Grant: $25,000
Matching Funds: $121,944

The Sound School Regional Vocational Aquaculture Center will provide direct educational experiences for high school students through hands-on marine research focused on water quality monitoring of pollutants and sediments, and determining changes to the ecology of New Haven Harbor and the central Long Island Sound in concert with researchers to provide critical information to municipal leaders engaged in development of new watershed management plans. The students will prepare Benthic Community and Sediment Sector Studies which are conducted to observe the impacts of development on benthic communities such as fish and aquatic vegetation living in or migrating through the Harbor. The students will prepare Shoreline Transect Studies which is a tool used to track the impact of water quality on ecosystems specifically sites in the rocky and sandy inter-tidal zones. Project partners will include the Sound School, Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, New Haven Land Trust, and New Haven University.

Funding is provided by the US Environmental Protection Agency.

Town of Greenwich

Project: Mianus River Pond Fish Way Access Walk
Long Island Sound Futures Fund Grant: $40,000
Matching Funds: $25,000

The Town of Greenwich will install an observation walkway to a local fishway providing safe, direct access to the facility for town staff, volunteers, students, and the general public to observe the winter to spring migration of thousands of alewife, blueback herring, gizzard shard, and American eel. Project partners include Mianus River Watershed Council, Connecticut Department of Environmental Conservation, Fish Restoration Project, and the Mianus Chapter of Trout Unlimited.

Funding provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Both States Connecticut and New York

National Audubon Society, New York and CT Audubon

Project: Model for LIS Stewardship Initiative Implementation: Important Bird Areas
Long Island Sound Futures Fund Grant: $40,000
Matching Funds: $76,319

The National Audubon Society will use Important Bird Areas in New York and Connecticut (e.g. Marshlands Conservancy, Pelham Bay Park, Oyster Bay, Orient Point and Plum Island, and Great Gull Island) as “test areas” to implement and evaluate communication and cooperation on stewardship planning and action. These sites provide geographic diversity as well as the opportunity to engage a variety of municipal, state, private, and Federal stewards. While the initial Stewardship Initiative sites have not been approved, there is an opportunity to facilitate cooperation in selected resource areas, learn from these situations and use the information to enhance stewardship for the sites later formally designated.

Funding is provided by the US Environmental Protection Agency and the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

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