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Fact Sheets

Wastewater Treatment

What is Wastewater? There is no question that the natural resource most critical to our everyday activities is water. We use water freely in our homes, yet give little thought to what happens to it after it goes down the drain. In fact, each of _ . us pours or flushes an average 100 ’ […] Continue Reading

How Low Dissolved Oxygen Conditions Affect Marine Life In Long Island Sound

Models The Long Island Sound Study (LISS) has developed computer models of the Sound to help understand the causes of hypoxia and identify what can be done about it. Designated by the LISS as the priority water quality problem in the Sound, hypoxia is the term applied to low dissolved oxygen conditions. It results from […] Continue Reading

Sound Values

While few people question the desirability of acting to protect and preserve Long Island Sound, serious questions arise regarding the costs. The Long Island Sound Study has produced a management plan that sets out an ambitious agenda to improve water quality, protect habitat and living resources, and educate and involve the public. This agenda includes […] Continue Reading

Impact of Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition on Long Island Sound

The Long Island Sound Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan (CCMP) identifies low dissolved oxygen, or hypoxia, as the most serious water quality impairment in the Sound. The annual summertime occurrence of hypoxia in the deeper waters of western Long Island Sound reduces the amount of healthy habitat necessary to support fish and shellfish. The CCMP […] Continue Reading

Alternative Strategies for Hypoxia Management

The Long Island Sound Conservation and Management Plan (CCMP) identifies low dissolved oxygen, or hypoxia, as the most serious water quality impairment in the Sound. The annual summertime occurrence of hypoxia in the deeper waters of western Long Island Sound reduces the amount of healthy habitat necessary to support fish and shellfish. The CCMP identifies […] Continue Reading

Long Island Sound Fact Sheet /February 2001

The National Estuary Program was established in 1987 by amendments to the Clean Water Act to identify, restore, and protect nationally significant estuaries of the United States. Unlike traditional regulatory approaches to environmental protection, the NEP targets a broad range of issues and engages local communities in the process. The program focuses not just on […] Continue Reading

Sound Health 2001 – Status and Trends in the Health of LIS

Since the federal Clean Water Act became law in 1972, investments in water pollution control programs have led to measurable improvements in the water quality of Long Island Sound. Obvious sources of pollution are now regulated and controlled through permit programs, tidal wetlands are protected, and major efforts to build and improve sewage treatment plants […] Continue Reading

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